Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Historic Site of the Week: Philipse Manor Hall

photo from Friends of Philipse Manor Hall website

Historical Description: Philipse Manor Hall was built in the 1680s by Frederick Philipse as a dwelling on the Lower Mills portion of his 52,500-acre estate. Philipse Manor Hall was an important symbol of what happened to Loyalists during the Revolution. Frederick Philipse III was LORD of Philipse Manor Hall during the Revolutionary period. His strong Loyalist views prompted him to sign the Declaration of Dependence in 1776, which caused George Washington to order his arrest. He lost the manor hall and the land it was on when the New York State Legislature confiscated it and eventually fled to England where he died broken in spirit and heart.

The Site: The Philipse Manor Hall is a stone manor designed with eighteenth-century, high style Georgian architecture and a 1750s paper mache Rococo ceiling. Today the Hall exhibits selections from Alexander Smith Cochran Collection of American Portraiture. It is a museum of history, art, and architecture including a 1750s paper mache Rococo ceiling.


Directions: From North, follow Route 9 to merge with Warburton Ave., right on Warburton, continue on Warburton for 4 miles, Manor Hall appears on right side, make right into driveway. From south, Route 9 to prospect street, left one block, right on Riverdale Ave., left into driveway after third traffic light.

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